What is Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) based on?

What is Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) based on?

NIRS is based on absorption of light by certain chromophores. When NIRS is used on biological tissue the main absorbing chromophores are hemoglobin and myoglobin. Both these chromophores have similar absorption spectra and cannot be distinguished using NIRS. However, most important for NIRS are the changes in oxygen binding to these chromophores. Very often only hemoglobin is used to refer to both chromophores, as also by us. Hemoglobin mainly exists in two forms, oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin.
The NIRS device measures changes in light absorption and uses the modified Lambert Beer law to calculate changes in hemoglobin concentrations.
Our NIRS devices also have the possibility to calculate absolute concentrations using spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS).
For more information you are referred to the manual.

What is Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) based on?

NIRS is based on absorption of light by certain chromophores. When NIRS is used on biological tissue the main absorbing chromophores are hemoglobin and myoglobin. Both these chromophores have similar absorption spectra and cannot be distinguished using NIRS. However, most important for NIRS are the changes in oxygen binding to these chromophores. Very often only hemoglobin is used to refer to both chromophores, as also by us. Hemoglobin mainly exists in two forms, oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin.
The NIRS device measures changes in light absorption and uses the modified Lambert Beer law to calculate changes in hemoglobin concentrations.
Our NIRS devices also have the possibility to calculate absolute concentrations using spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS).
For more information you are referred to the manual.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *